11th September 2014

Photoset

Photograph | Free Syrian Army fighters walk through rubble at Aleppo’s Umayyad Mosque in December 2013 | Molhem Barakat | Reuters/Corbis

Archaeologists Train “Monuments Men” to Save Syria’s Past

Photograph | Aleppo’s Umayyad mosque: the rubble is all that remains of its minaret, which was blown up during fighting last year | Getty

The destruction of the Idols: Syria’s patrimony at risk from extremists

Tagged: SyriaantiquitiesAleppomosque

11th September 2014

Quote reblogged from Three Good Links with 11 notes

In other words, the “war on terror,” the waging of which has shaped the political landscape for so much of the world since 2001, has demonstrably failed. Until the fall of Mosul, nobody paid much attention.

Patrick Cockburn at Tom DispatchWhy Washington’s War on Terror Failed 

The Underrated Saudi Connection 

The Jihadis Return:ISIS AND THE NEW SUNNI UPRISING

(via protoslacker)

11th September 2014

Photo

Visualization of meme diffusion related to the Arab Spring and the 2011 uprisings from the #Egypt hashtag, which shows strong connectivity and many users linked to one another to form a dense cluster. 
Credit | Indiana University
Whether tweets live or die depends more on network, competition for attention than message or user influence
phys.org | Apr 03 2012

Visualization of meme diffusion related to the Arab Spring and the 2011 uprisings from the #Egypt hashtag, which shows strong connectivity and many users linked to one another to form a dense cluster.

Credit | Indiana University

Whether tweets live or die depends more on network, competition for attention than message or user influence

phys.org | Apr 03 2012

Tagged: tweetsvisualizationArab SpringmemeEgypt

11th September 2014

Quote with 4 notes

My topic was electronic civil disobedience. During the question and answer period at the end of my talk, an audience member told me that what I was suggesting was not a civil tactic of political contestation at all; rather, the tactic that I had suggested was pure terrorism. I found this comment to be very curious because I could not understand who (or more to the point, what) this audience member thought was being terrorized. How can terror happen in virtual space, that is, in a space with no people - only information? Have we reached a point in civilization where we are capable of terrorizing digital abstractions? How was it that this intelligent person had come to believe that electronic disruption equaled terror?

The Mythology of Terrorism on the Net

Critical Art Ensemble | Summer 1995

Tagged: Critical Art Ensemblenetinternetterrorismcivil disobedienceelectronic civil disobediencevirtual space

11th September 2014

Video

Hacking US (and UK, Australia, France, etc.) Traffic Control Systems

Cesar Cerrudo

Tagged: Cesar Cerrudohackingtraffic control systemsvideo

11th September 2014

Quote

Probably many of you have watched scenes from “Live Free or Die Hard” (Die Hard 4) where “terrorist hackers” manipulate traffic signals by just hitting Enter or typing a few keys. I wanted to do that! I started to look around, and while I couldn’t exactly do the same thing (too Hollywood style!), I got pretty close. I found some interesting devices used by traffic control systems in important US cities, and I could hack them :)

Cesar Cerrudo | Hacking US (and UK, Australia, France, etc.) Traffic Control Systems

Located from Tomorrow’s cities - what happens when lights go out? | BBC 

Jane Wakefield | 11 September 2014

Tagged: cityCesar Cerrudohackingcitiestraffic signals

11th September 2014

Photo reblogged from A Momentary Flow with 21 notes

wildcat2030:

City As Superintelligence - A movement is afoot to cover some of the largest and most populated cities in the world with a sophisticated array of interconnected sensors, cameras, and recording devices, able to track and respond to every crime or traffic jam ,every crisis or pandemic, as if it were an artificial immune system spread out over hundreds of densely packed kilometers filled with millions of human beings. The movement goes by the name of smart-cities, or sometimes sentient cities, and the fate of the project is intimately tied to the fate of humanity in the 21st century and beyond because the question of how the city is organized will define the world we live in from here forwards -the beginning of era of urban mankind. Here are just some of many possible examples of smart cities at work, there is the city of Sondgo in South Korea a kind of testing ground for companies such as Cisco which can experiment with integrated technologies, to quote a recent article on the subject, such as:
TelePresence system, an advanced videoconferencing technology that allows residents to access a wide range of services including remote health care, beauty consulting and remote learning, as well as touch screens that enable residents to control their unit’s energy use.
Another example would be IBM’s Smart City Initiative in Rio which has covered that city with a dense network of sensors and cameras that allow centralized monitoring and control of vital city functions, and was somewhat brazenly promoted by that city’s mayor during a TED Talk in 2012. New York has set up a similar system, but it is in the non-Western world where smart cities will live or die because it is there where almost all of the world’s increasingly rapid urbanization is taking place.
Thus India, which has yet to urbanize like its neighbor, and sometimes rival, China, has plans to build up to 100 smart cities with 4.5 billion of the funding towards such projects being provided by perhaps the most urbanized country on the planet- Japan.
 (via City As Superintelligence)

wildcat2030:

City As Superintelligence
-
A movement is afoot to cover some of the largest and most populated cities in the world with a sophisticated array of interconnected sensors, cameras, and recording devices, able to track and respond to every crime or traffic jam ,every crisis or pandemic, as if it were an artificial immune system spread out over hundreds of densely packed kilometers filled with millions of human beings. The movement goes by the name of smart-cities, or sometimes sentient cities, and the fate of the project is intimately tied to the fate of humanity in the 21st century and beyond because the question of how the city is organized will define the world we live in from here forwards -the beginning of era of urban mankind.
Here are just some of many possible examples of smart cities at work, there is the city of Sondgo in South Korea a kind of testing ground for companies such as Cisco which can experiment with integrated technologies, to quote a recent article on the subject, such as:

TelePresence system, an advanced videoconferencing technology that allows residents to access a wide range of services including remote health care, beauty consulting and remote learning, as well as touch screens that enable residents to control their unit’s energy use.

Another example would be IBM’s Smart City Initiative in Rio which has covered that city with a dense network of sensors and cameras that allow centralized monitoring and control of vital city functions, and was somewhat brazenly promoted by that city’s mayor during a TED Talk in 2012. New York has set up a similar system, but it is in the non-Western world where smart cities will live or die because it is there where almost all of the world’s increasingly rapid urbanization is taking place.

Thus India, which has yet to urbanize like its neighbor, and sometimes rival, China, has plans to build up to 100 smart cities with 4.5 billion of the funding towards such projects being provided by perhaps the most urbanized country on the planet- Japan.


(via City As Superintelligence)

11th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Tokyo Street Photography with 31 notes

lkazphoto:

Window washers, Hamamatsucho (浜松町)

lkazphoto:

Window washers, Hamamatsucho (浜松町)

11th September 2014

Quote with 1 note

Neither cities nor places in them are unordered, unplanned; the question is only whose order, whose planning, for what purpose?

Peter Marcuse

Not chaos, but walls: Postmodernism and the partitioned city

This Big City | Ideas for Sustainable Cities

Tagged: Peter Marcusecitiescityplanningorderpurposequote

11th September 2014

Photo reblogged from A Glimpse of Tokyo with 67 notes

dochuff:

Shinagawa Rush
Morning at Shinagawa Station, Tokyo

dochuff:

Shinagawa Rush

Morning at Shinagawa Station, Tokyo